Go to contents

THE DONG-A ILBO Logo

Cambridge saves face amid pressure from Chinese authorities

Cambridge saves face amid pressure from Chinese authorities

Posted August. 23, 2017 08:50,   

Updated August. 23, 2017 09:05

한국어

A renowned British academic journal that deleted politically sensitive papers under the pressure from Chinese authorities decided to republish the papers on its website in China. Experts comment that the journal has protected the "freedom to learn" by overcoming the burdens from the "Chinese market."

According to BBC China on Tuesday, the globally respected academic journal "The China Quarterly" published by Cambridge University Press has decided to restore access to around 300 papers on its website after four days of deletion upon requests from the Chinese State Administration of Press, Publication, Radio, Film and Television. Deleted articles include politically sensitive issues to China, such as Tiannen Square massacre, Tibet, Uyghur, the Cultural Revolution, Taiwan and Hong Kong.

"After rounds of meetings with the relevant personnel, we've decided to republish those articles," said Tim Pringle, editor of the China Quarterly. "We will no longer consider subjects or political sensitivity during the dissertation. examinations." He also expressed their rigorous efforts in preventing the entire Chinese website from being blocked, saying, "We complied with this initial request to remove individual articles, to ensure that other academic and educational materials we publish remain available to researchers and educators in this market."

Harsh criticisms fell upon the China Quarterly published since 1960, the oldest publisher Cambridge University Press, which established in 1534, and Cambridge University, which boasts its 800 years of establishment, saying, "The freedom to learn has succumbed to the Chinese market." When met with fierce opposition from around 300 people with petition led by Beijing University Professor Christopher Balding, Cambridge University Press has decided to change its course.



Ja-Ryong Koo bonhong@donga.com